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Bone Health

There are a number of factors that influence bone density and overall bone health:

Calcium intake – Green foods are excellent sources of calcium. While most folks take in enough calcium by way of diet, there are occasions when calcium supplementation may be helpful. However, most folks do not need additional calcium.

Vitamin C deficiency is often related to bone loss. Read “Death by Calcium” By Thomas Levy, MD and consider supplementing with Liposomal Vitamin C and/or sodium ascorbate.

Magnesium intake – About 68% of the US population are deficient in magnesium. This can be a greater factor in bone health than calcium as most folks who are deficient in magnesium are calcium sufficient. Again our green foods are excellent sources of magnesium and should make up a large portion of our diet. When supplemental magnesium is needed, a time release supplement may be the best option.

Body sufficiency of vitamin D. The vast majority of folks have less than optimal levels of vitamin D. Blood levels below 30 ng/ml are considered deficient but levels of 50-80 ng/ml are optimal. Without adequate vitamin D, the calcium and magnesium are not utilized efficiently. Be sure to supplement with K2 when supplementing with vitamin D3.

Weight bearing exercise may be the most important. Without weight bearing or resistant exercise the bones are not signaled to draw in the calcium and magnesium.

Vitamin K supplementation may be one of the most if not the important components and is essential to direct calcium to the bones and keep it out of tissues where it is not needed or desired.

Why is Supplementing with Magnesium a Good Idea?

Firstly, magnesium is necessary for the proper transportation of calcium across cell membranes. Why? Calcium needs other nutrients that help get calcium into bone matter. Those other nutrients are silica, vitamin D, vitamin K, and, you guessed it – magnesium. Excessive calcium intake has been linked to heart health issues by staying in the blood long enough to calcify into arterial plaque.”

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