Here are a few health benefits of avocado seed, plus the proper way to eat and prepare it.
Here are a few health benefits of avocado seed, plus the proper way to eat and prepare it.

Health Benefits of Avocado Seed

As a faithful follower of the Hallelujah Diet, you're likely aware that avocado is a healthy fat that comes with a multitude of health benefits. It's loaded with monounsaturated fatty acids, has more potassium than banana and has the potential to help lower your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. But have you ever considered the power of its pit? The avocado seed is also incredibly nutritious, so you may want to stop throwing it in the wastebasket!

Here are a few health benefits of avocado seed, plus the proper way to eat and prepare it:

Health Benefits of Avocado Seed
While the avocado itself harbors many health benefits, Step to Health reported that 70 percent of the advantageous amino acids are found in the fruit's pulp! Avocado seed is a true powerhouse when it comes to nutrients, containing protein, carbohydrates, phosphorus, sodium, zinc and more, according to Organic Facts. Consider the following reasons to add avocado seed to your plant-based eating regimen:

1. It helps burn fat. The pulp is loaded with soluble fiber, which can help you feel fuller and more satisfied over a long period of time. Plus, it naturally contains fat burning elements!

2. It prevents cell aging. Its antioxidant content protects the brain from free radicals.

3. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk. Because of its amino acid content, the seed is great for lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels just like the rest of the avocado.

4. It can help treat diarrhea and intestinal issues. Avocado seed is an astringent, so it's great for reducing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.

5. It's good for your skin. When cooked, processed and applied topically, avocado seed can eliminate blemishes and rejuvenate the skin due to its ability to boost collagen.

Split avocadoDon't let you avocado seed go to waste!

How to Prepare and Eat Avocado Seed
Now that you know just how beneficial the avocado seed truly is, it's important to understand how to prepare and eat it. Here's how we recommend getting this powerful superfood ready for consumption, as explained by Natural Living Ideas:

First, remove the pit from the avocado and rinse under cold water.

Next, place the pit on a pan prepared with parchment paper and let dehydrate in the oven at 250 degrees for about two hours. When the seed is ready, the outer skin will look completely dried out.

Remove from oven, let cool and then remove the outer skin.

Using a large knife, pop open the avocado seed at the seam. The dehydration process should soften up the seed, so this shouldn't take much effort.

From there, dice up the seed into small pieces. Transfer pieces to a blender or food processors, pulsing until it reaches a fine, grainy texture.

Now, you can add the avocado seed to smoothies and baked goods or you can sprinkle it over various plant-based dishes to reap the benefits. Look through our database of recipes to find a meal that you can easily add grated avocado seed to.

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8 comments

  1. Wow! I did not know that about the avocado seed. I just recently started to like the avocado on my turkey burgers or in my salad. I think I will try baking the seed and then use the seed in my smoothies. This is great to fine out how important the seed is. The different things the seed is good for, its amazing.

  2. I threw away an avocado seed two days ago. Never again will I do that. This is wonderful news! Thank you so much. One question, though…won’t dehydrating at 250 degrees kill the enzymes?

  3. That’s amazing! I’ll definitely be adding that to my smoothies. You didn’t say how we can apply it topically to our skin. Really interested in that! Thank you

  4. Which foods tend to cause constipation?

    • Janice, constipation is something I battle with. I am still trying to figure out the true culprit (including which foods) and I think many aspects play into the problem. There are two times that I recall not having an issue with it. 1) When I was primarily vegan and raw and eating lots of blended veggie soups for dinner. Blending is much easier on the gut. 2) Another time was when a friend was making me raw cow milk kefir.

  5. Thanks for the tips on how to use the avocado seed to our benefit. The only thing I have ever tried to do with it was to attempt to sprout and grow a plant. I have never had much success at that. Let’s see if I can have more success at using the seeds for actual nutrient value!

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