COVID-19 Update: How to protect yourself. Click Here to Learn More.

Food Label Lies

Food labels are pretty straight forward, right? Wrong.

As more and more health-conscious consumers get smart about reading labels before making a purchase, companies with not-so-healthy ingredients are finding ways to save face.

You really need to know the what the rules are and how food manufacturers get around them to make a product sound wholesome and good for you.

For example, we’ve been conditioned to think that just because something says it’s “natural” that it’s a good thing. But the term “natural” means nothing on a food label anymore.

Anyone can say it about pretty much any kind of ingredient. For example, “natural flavors” can be code for MSG.  In fact, MSG is known by a host of aliases including:

  • autolyzed yeast
  • calcium caseinate
  • gelatin
  • glutamate
  • glutamic acid
  • hydrolyzed corn gluten
  • hydrolyzed protein
  • hydrolyzed soy protein
  • monopotassium glutamate
  • monosodium glutamate
  • plant protein extract
  • sodium caseinate
  • textured protein
  • yeast extract
  • yeast food

Labels are loaded with wording like this. You have to take it with a grain of salt, so to speak.

A phrase such as “no added sugar” may mean nothing if other ingredients (such as dried fruit, for example) are high in natural sugar in the first place.

Furthermore, “all natural” may rule out chemical additives, but the sum total of all the ingredients may result in a fatty, cholesterol laden, high calorie, low nutrient, yet “all natural” empty food (like snack chips fried in GMO corn oil, for example).

Reading all ingredients on any packaged food should be common practice for anyone looking to improve their health. And the shorter the list, the better.

Long ingredient lists are the result of a snowball effect: one ingredient is not stable without the other, or may require some creative chemistry to meld with a host of other ingredients in order to give the product its desired taste or texture. The result is an arduous list of chemical additives.

Simple, wholesome foods have no need for ingredients tagged with words like “enriched” (which, in reality, means non-absorbable vitamins and/or minerals that have been added to a depleted, dead food), nor do they need to mislead by using chemical names or code words instead of being honest.

Here’s the bottom line… if you don’t recognize an ingredient on a food package, don’t buy it.

It’s the best way to stay “all natural.”

[quote]Which ingredient is an automatic “no” for you?
Scroll below the related articles to comment![/quote]

 

Comments

  1. Any kind of “isolate” or “soy” or “hydrogenated” or “hydrolyzed” makes me put the product back on the shelf immediately!

  2. Hushie July 10, 2013

    high fructose corn syrup

  3. soy anything

  4. Kristine July 10, 2013

    There are so many “unhealthy” products on the market. Sad! Thanks for this article. Even people who are trying to make wise purchases are getting fooled by the money hungry manufactures.

  5. jfaborny July 11, 2013

    Canola Oil…. Horrible, horrible, horrible… Did I say horrible yet?

  6. Monsodium Glutamate by any name gives me neck, head pain and feel really horrible. My sister-in-law has to go to the hospital if she eats even a tiny bit of it…

  7. Your articles are truthful and informative; you
    should consider making e-mail broadcasts of your articles. They should be short
    & easy to understand; like your articles.
    Redundancy lol

  8. Leuanna July 14, 2013

    whey

  9. Just one letter: E

  10. MSG gives me a headache. The last three times I ate pizza at pizza hut I got a bad headache but they say they don’t use MSG. HMMM

  11. Artificial sweeteners and MSG

  12. Elsie Hudson February 18, 2015

    Q. Does sprouting an acid grain change it enough to make it non-acid Or acceptable for a person with osteoporosis?
    Q. Does making yogurt out of a cow product change it into an acceptable food?
    Q. What grains are non- acid and what foods that we think of as grains are not really grains and therefore acceptable?

    • Christy Okon February 19, 2015

      Q. Does sprouting an acid grain change it enough to make it non-acid Or acceptable for a person with osteoporosis?

      >>Sprouting will move acidic grains to a more alkaline forming state – However, keep in mind an optimal diet consists of about 80% alkaline forming foods and 20% acid forming foods – nothing wrong with some acid forming foods.

      Q. Does making yogurt out of a cow product change it into an acceptable food?

      >>The Hallelujah Diet excludes ALL animal source foods.

      Q. What grains are non- acid and what foods that we think of as grains are not really grains and therefore acceptable?

      >>You can do a Google search and get a wealth of information on acid forming grains and alkaline forming grains.
      I would strongly encourage reading the book, Death By Calcium by Thom Levy, M.D, and Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox by Kate Rheamume-Bleue, N.D. These two books can help anyone dealing with osteoporosis immensely

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *